Los Angeles Mayor Requiring Major Cutbacks in Water Use from Elaine Golden-Gealer

California’s in the middle of a long and persistent drought that could drag on for many more years, and so Mayor Garcetti announced yesterday that he’d like the entire city to drastically reduce the amount of water it uses—his goal is to bring use of drinkable water down by 20 percent and have the LADWP cut back on buying imported water by 50 percent, both by 2017. On his website, the mayor outlines plans for residents and city departments that will help meet these goals, adding that, while the reductions are voluntary now, they might become mandatory if benchmark goals aren’t met on time (i.e., if people ignore them and continue watering their cement).

Garcetti is asking Angelenos to comply with the following non-outrageous water restrictions:
— Reduce watering outside to two days a week
— Replace green, water-guzzling lawns with “native and climate-appropriate” landscaping
— Install low-flow fixtures where possible within the home
— Put covers on pools already (the loss to evaporation is insane)

It’s not all on residents, though. City agencies can be just as wasteful and will have to step up too, making the following cutbacks and adjustments:
— Watering at city buildings and in street medians a maximum of two days a week with non-recycled, drinkable water
— City departments will have to post their watering schedules in public at their facilities
— The Department of Rec and Parks will have three months to come up with a plan to convert 85 percent of their golf courses—notoriously thirsty places—to recycled water use by 2017
— LADWP will increase rebates for turf removal and rain barrels

These and other voluntary restrictions outlined in the mayor’s executive directive on the matter could become mandatory if they don’t result in a 10 percent reduction in water consumption by July 2015, a 15 percent reduction by January 2016, and a 20 percent reduction by January 2017. Mandatory restrictions might include limits on outdoor watering (two days a week or fewer), carwashing at professional car washes that use recycled water only, and a ban on filling swimming pools with potable water. KPCC notes that it’s not yet clear how the LADWP would enforce these mandatory cutbacks, but let’s hope we don’t get there, huh?

Elaine                                                     
DRE #00598428
Senior Director, Coldwell Banker New Homes Division
With over 200 condominium, townhome and loft projects successfully marketed

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