7 office gadgets headed for the graveyard by Elaine360

The Rolodex is first up on a list of office tools that may soon become obsolete. Invented in 1956, this rotating filing system for business contacts remained a fixture on most office desks well into the computer age. But some 58% of the 7,000 professionals surveyed by LinkedIn say the devices will likely be seen only on exhibit at the Smithsonian within the next five years.

Fax machines: The demise of the fax has been predicted for years, but these office workhorses may finally be put out to pasture, according to 71% of those surveyed. Indeed, they are No. 2 on LinkedIn’s soon-to-be-extinct list. Some of those who regard their paper-eating ways as environmentally unsound have even filmed themselves smashing their faxes to make their point.

Desktop phones: Now that email and instant messaging have rendered most phone conversations unnecessary, 35% of professionals say the desktop telephone will soon be merely decorative. This may not be as far-fetched as it sounds, especially if home phones are anything to go by. Only a decade ago, 97% of American homes had a landline, compared with just 74% of homes today, according to a study by Pew Research.

Tape recorders: When Mark Spoonauer, editor-in-chief at LaptopMag.com, wants to record an interview, he uses the record function on his iPhone. Smartphones are already replacing digital recorders. It’s no wonder that some 79% of those surveyed by LinkedIn say tape recorders will soon be obsolete.

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Elaine                                                     
DRE #00598428
Senior Director, Coldwell Banker New Homes Division
With over 200 condominium, townhome and loft projects successfully marketed

“Fewer properties for sale with such remarkably low interest rates make it a great time to sell but a more difficult time to buy”

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